Friday, June 1, 2012

~Kashata~

Posted by M.S. at 12:34 PM 0 comments Links to this post
Photo: KASHATA

This is a snack of Swahili origin that's popular in East Africa and resembles biscuits in texture. Ingredients:380g sugar350g fresh coconut (or 330g desiccated coconut moistened with a few tablespoons of milk) or 350g roasted peanuts briefly heated in a lightly-oiled pan (you can also use half coconut and half peanuts)1/2 tsp ground cinnamon1/2 tsp ground cardamompinch of salt100g flour (optional)
 Kashata Preparation:
Method:Heat the sugar in a hot frying pan until it melts and just begins to brown. Then reduce the heat and all all the remaining ingredients as quickly as possible and stir to combine. Continue stirring for about a minute to ensure that everything has combined. Scoop the mixture into a dish or tray that's been lightly greased or lined with greaseproof paper and allow to cool and rest for a few minutes. Tip out of the pan and cut into squares or diamonds whilst still warm. Allow to cool completely then serve.


 
This is a snack of Swahili origin that's popular in East Africa and resembles biscuits in texture.
 
Ingredients:
380g sugar
350g fresh coconut (or 330g desiccated coconut moistened with a few tablespoons of milk)
                                                        or
350g roasted peanuts & grinded coarsley  (you can also use half coconut and half peanuts)
 
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground cardamom
Pinch of salt
100g flour (optional)

Kashata Preparation:
Method:
Please note that you can make these either of grated/desicated Coconut or Cashewnuts powder (or combine half of both).
 
Heat the sugar in a hot frying pan until it melts and just begins to brown. Then reduce the heat and all all the remaining ingredients as quickly as possible and stir to combine. Continue stirring for about a minute to ensure that everything has combined. Scoop the mixture into a dish or tray that's been lightly greased or lined with greaseproof paper and spreat it evernly and allow to cool and rest for a few minutes. Tip out of the pan and cut into squares or diamonds whilst still warm. Allow to cool completely then serve. 
 
It is best served with Black Arabic coffee (Kahawa in Kiswahili).  The joy of having this aromatic hot coffee is more to drink from these small arabic cups, with no sugar, straight from a portable coffee set consisting of a charcoal stove, copper kettle and a basket of small cup rinsed with some suspicious looking water... It adds to the flavor..lol...If ever you find yourself in those areas of Dar es Salaam, try this coffee in the heat of the sun, it will quench your thirst amazingly!
 

This is the way they serve the Kiswahili Kahawa:
 
 

Always Dream

I want to curl up here and enjoy my leisure time with a book and cup of hot chocolate /coffee late and relax whilst the Sunshine warms me and the breeze plays through my hair.







My Dreams:)